Friday, 24 May 2013

Kolar: Shadow of the ancient Kuvalapura

Kolar: Shadow of the ancient Kuvalapura

Overview: Kolar district is a well known travel destination with many ancient temples like Avani, Mulbagal, Kaivara. But Kolar City alone also has many specialities to offer. Like the ones we experienced recently. We decided to visit the two popular temples in Kolar- Someshwara temple and Kolaramma temple. Kolar or ancient Kuvalapura was ruled by the Gangas in the 3rd century followed by the Cholas and later by Hoysalas and the Vijayanagara rulers.
The Someshwara temple was built in the 14th century by the Vijayanagar rulers in a typical Dravidian style. This temple also closely resembles the Someshwara temple in Ulsoor, Bangalore. The entrance has a high stone Mahadwara half of which is recently painted in yellow. On the walls we can see the carvings of elephants, dwarfs and lions. The sanctum wall at cardinal directions have Devakoshtas flanked by two slender pillar turrets. The Kalyana mantapa in the south-west is an exquisitely beautiful structure known for craftsmanship on granite. The small shrine towards north-west is dedicated to the consort of the main deity Shiva.
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Near to the Someshwara temple is the Kolaramma temple which is the village godess as well. This temple indicates two shrines built in Dravidian style of architecture. The main doorway is well carved having an imposing appearence. The lower course of the wall to the left of the mukhamantapa has Rajendra Chola's inscriptions in old Tamil. A Bhutagana and lion are depicted below and above the cornice respectively. Inside the temple are the idols of Sapthamatrikas and of Kolaramma, in the form of Mahishasuramardhini with eight hands and a demon under the feet. There is also a stone image of the six feet high Kalabhairava which is known as Mukanacharamma because of the broken nose.
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How to reach: Bus: KSRTC buses and also several private buses ply regularly from Bangalore to Kolar.
By Bike/Car: Take the NH4 to reach Kolar via Hosakote.
References: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kolar
Food/Accommodation: Kamat Upachar is a good option for food on NH4 near Narsapura.
Map:

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3 comments:

  1. Nice temples. The kotilingeshwara temple is also very interesting!

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  2. TAMIL INSCRIPTIONS IN TEMPLES BUILT BY GANGAS AND HOYSALAS
    The Cholas ruled south Karnataka from 1004 to 1117 AD. Their primary contribution was in setting up an efficient administrative mechanism to collect taxes. The administrative officers also doubled as Stanikas (caretakers) of existing Temples. The Hoysalas in the 12th and 13th centuries retained the Tamil Stanikas as administrators. The Stanikas left Tamil inscriptions of contributions made to Temples that were built during Ganga and Hoysala times.
    Source: the importance of Stanikas - Bombay University

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  3. Example the Someshwara Temples built by Hoysalas

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